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OSP Occupational Profile

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NOC Code: NOC Code: 2233b Occupation: Quality Control Technicians
Occupation Description: Occupation Description:
This profile was developed as part of an occupational standard. The NOC group to which it relates is "Industrial Engineering and Manufacturing Technologists and Technicians". Industrial engineering and manufacturing technologists and technicians may work independently or provide technical support and services in the development of production methods, facilities and systems, and the planning, estimating, measuring and scheduling of work. They are employed by manufacturing and insurance companies, government departments and in other industries. This profile was developed as part of an occupational standard. The NOC group to which it relates is "Industrial Engineering and Manufacturing Technologists and Technicians". Industrial engineering and manufacturing technologists and technicians may work independently or provide technical support and services in the development of production methods, facilities and systems, and the planning, estimating, measuring and scheduling of work. They are employed by manufacturing and insurance companies, government departments and in other industries.

  • Click on any of the Essential Skills to view sample workplace tasks for this occupation.
  • Skill levels are assigned to tasks: Level 1 tasks are the least complex and level 4 or 5 tasks (depending upon the specific skill) are the most complex. Skill levels are associated with workplace tasks and not the workers performing these tasks.
  • Scroll down the page to get information on career planning, education and training, and employment and volunteer opportunities.

Table will display the Skill Level for the Noc specified
Essential Skills Essential Skills Levels
Reading Text Reading Text 1 2 3 4
Writing Writing 1 2 3 4
Document Use Document Use 1 2 3
Computer Use Computer Use 1 2 3
Oral Communication Oral Communication 1 2 3
Measurement and Calculation Measurement and Calculation 1 2
Data Analysis Data Analysis 1 2 3
Job Task Planning and Organizing Job Task Planning and Organizing 1 2 3
Decision Making Decision Making 1 2 3
Problem Solving Problem Solving 1 2 3
Finding Information Finding Information 1 2


  • The skill levels represented in the above chart illustrate the full range of sample tasks performed by experienced workers and not individuals preparing for or entering this occupation for the first time.
  • Note that some occupational profiles do not include all Numeracy and Thinking Essential Skills.

If you would like to print a copy of the chart and sample tasks, click on the "Print Occupational Profile" button at the top of the page.


Reading Text
  • Scan labels on garments for specific information and to confirm that the information is accurate. (1)
  • Read descriptions on various styles of clothing to obtain data about the operations required for their construction. (2)
  • Read memos on company bulletin boards regarding policy or social announcements. (2)
  • Refer to notes on customer specifications sheets to ensure that production is meeting the customers' requirements. (2)
  • Read company procedure manuals. (3)
  • Read books or journal articles on quality methods. (3)
  • Read the standards guide/manual to avoid production errors and to critique or evaluate it for revisions. (4)
  • Read the returns report to improve quality by analysing the reasons for clients' dissatisfaction. (4)
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Writing
  • Write a list of employees, noting the operations that they are carrying out. (1)
  • Jot notes to yourself throughout the day to follow up on observations. (1)
  • Write a short quality control report which is used to take corrective action when required. (3)
  • Write a more detailed report based on research. (4)
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Document Use
  • Read lists of employees and the operations that they are carrying out. (1)
  • Read signs posted throughout your workplaces to comply with safety requirements. (1)
  • Read universal product codes (UPC) and universal container codes (UCC). (1)
  • Read patterns. (2)
  • Read diagrams in company procedure manuals. (2)
  • Consult the bill of materials to verify that the correct materials are being used. (2)
  • Read Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) labels. (2)
  • Refer to production tables when planning the work day. (2)
  • Get information from computer-based spreadsheets. (3)
  • Review drawings and data in product information from suppliers. (3)
  • Read test results for verification purposes. (3)
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Computer Use
  • Use communications software. For example, send production information to head office electronically. (2)
  • Use a database. For example, check criteria sheets from samples, then confirm information by using the existing database in the computer. (2)
  • Use graphics software. For example, produce illustrations or patterns for garment pieces. (3)
  • Use statistical analysis software. For example, carry out statistical quality control. (3)
  • Use a spreadsheet. For example, analyze cost/quality standards. (3)
  • Use computer applications such as computer-controlled equipment in the plant to monitor quality control. For example, use a scanner to record information from operator functions, then transfer data to the computer and conduct an analysis on the resulting database. (3)
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Oral Communication
  • Exchange information with supervisors during quality meetings. (1)
  • Interact with the supervisor to co-ordinate work. (1)
  • Work with sewing machine operators to persuade them to make needed changes. (2)
  • Interact with the production supervisor/manager to discuss product quality. (2)
  • Interact with internal suppliers to collaborate in optimizing production processes. (2)
  • Interact with suppliers to resolve problems with fabric. (2)
  • Interact with operators to monitor progress and correct work that does not meet quality standards. At times this involves dealing with hostile reactions. (2)
  • Lead meetings with production staff (supervisors and sewing machine operators). (3)
  • Interact with the quality manager to provide progress reports and troubleshoot complex problems. (3)
  • Negotiate with customers regarding quality disputes. (3)
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Measurement and Calculation
  • Measure or weigh products to assess conformity to quality standards. (1)
  • Calculate fabric and clothing quantities in order to monitor production. (2)
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Data Analysis
  • Analyze data to assess the performance of fabrics. (3)
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Job Task Planning and Organizing
  • Quality control technicians have flexibility in ordering their job tasks and the ordering impacts on efficiency. They participate in establishing priorities, which are driven by clients' requirements and deadlines, and receive their task assignments from at least one or two persons. Quality control technicians also participate in establishing the order in which tasks are executed and the ordering of their tasks impacts on efficiency. Most quality control technicians follow a work plan that is highly integrated with the work of others (e.g., operators, supervisors). There are recurring disruptions (e.g., equipment breakdowns) that require them to adjust their daily schedules. (3)
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Decision Making
  • Make decisions about correcting work that does not meet quality standards that are already established. (2)
  • Recommend, contribute to, and maintain appropriate quality standards. (2)
  • Interpret conflicting quality standards and make decisions about seconds. (3)
  • Make decisions about troubleshooting complex quality issues, in consultation with your supervisor and others. (3)
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Problem Solving
  • A customer's order does not meet the specifications and in addressing this you are faced with a hostile reaction from operators. Use your technical skills and knowledge to identify the cause of the problem. (2)
  • After analyzing data, you conclude that there is far too much wastage. Monitor operations to gather information in determining potential reasons for the wastage. You may also collaborate with others (e.g., production manager, supervisors, suppliers) to obtain and exchange relevant information. Make waste-reducing recommendations to the quality manager. Any authorized process changes are monitored closely to evaluate their impact. (3)
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Finding Information
  • Review previous customer orders for special instructions. (1)
  • Consult suppliers to determine which machine parts work best with various materials. (1)
  • Review costing information. (1)
  • Consult the quality manager, production manager and supervisors to find information needed for solving quality problems. (2)
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