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OSP Occupational Profile

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NOC Code: NOC Code: 3237 Occupation: Other technical occupations in therapy and assessment
Occupation Description: Occupation Description:
This unit group includes workers, not elsewhere classified, who perform various technical therapy and assessment functions. Some may assist professionals such as audiologists, speech-language pathologists, ophthalmologists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists. They are employed in hospitals, clinics, extended care facilities, rehabilitation centres, educational institutions and in the private practices of the professionals they assist. This unit group includes workers, not elsewhere classified, who perform various technical therapy and assessment functions. Some may assist professionals such as audiologists, speech-language pathologists, ophthalmologists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists. They are employed in hospitals, clinics, extended care facilities, rehabilitation centres, educational institutions and in the private practices of the professionals they assist.

  • Click on any of the Essential Skills to view sample workplace tasks for this occupation.
  • Scroll down the page to get information on career planning, education and training, and employment and volunteer opportunities.

Table will display the Skill Level for the Noc specified
Essential Skills Essential Skills Levels
Reading Reading 1 2 3
Writing Writing 1 2
Document Use Document Use 1 2 3
Digital Technology Digital Technology 1 2
Oral Communication Oral Communication 1 2 3
Measurement and Calculation Measurement and Calculation 1 2
Data Analysis Data Analysis 1 2
Decision Making Decision Making 1 2 3
Finding Information Finding Information 1 2
Critical Thinking Critical Thinking 1 2


  • The skill levels represented in the above chart illustrate the full range of sample tasks performed by experienced workers and not individuals preparing for or entering this occupation for the first time.
  • Note that some occupational profiles do not include all Numeracy and Thinking Essential Skills.

If you would like to print a copy of the chart and sample tasks, click on the "Print Occupational Profile" button at the top of the page.


Reading
  • Read short text passages on product labels, e.g. physical rehabilitation technicians read safe handling procedures on products used for disinfecting equipment surfaces. (1)
  • Read doctors' reports or operating room reports for information on clients' injuries and surgery performed. (Physiotherapy assistants) (2)
  • Read information about government programs, e.g. long term care physiotherapists read about the types of assistive devices, such as wheelchairs and prostheses, funded by provincial ministries of health. (3)
  • Read manufacturers' equipment and product manuals, e.g. audiometric assistants read manuals to understand how hearing aids operate, procedures for cleaning and maintenance and troubleshooting steps. (3)
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Writing
  • Write email to supervisors, colleagues and co-workers, e.g. communication assistants write to speech-language pathologists requesting suggestions for working with patients who are not responding to current treatments. (2)
  • Write letters, e.g. ophthalmic medical assistants write letters to the providers of medical health plans regarding outstanding payments. (2)
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Document Use
  • Locate bones, muscles, organs and other structures on drawings and radiographs, e.g. audiometric assistants use ear drawings to show patients where cochlear implants are to be placed. (2)
  • Read and record data on patients' range of movement to compare their weekly progress. (Physiotherapy assistants) (2)
  • Extract data from graphs and interpret trends, e.g. audiometric and communication assistants interpret graphs showing patients' language, hearing and skill acquisition and progress results (2)
  • Complete a variety of forms, checklists and graph plots, e.g. physical rehabilitation technicians complete requisition forms for equipment, such as prostheses, mobility aids and specialized seating systems. (3)
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Digital Technology
  • Use computer-controlled equipment. For example, chiropractic assistants operate ultrasounds, muscle stimulators and lasers with digital keypad inputs and readouts. (1)
  • Use digital equipment, such as audiometers and sound meters, to measure the hearing abilities of patients. (2)
  • Use specialized software, e.g. audiometric assistants use specialized software to program hearing aids and verify their operating capacities. Communication assistants use specialized software to show patients their voice intonations and inflections. (2)
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Oral Communication
  • Gather information from patients, explain procedures and coach them through exercises and tasks, e.g. audiometric assistants provide patients with instruction for inserting, removing and cleaning hearing aids. (2)
  • Gather information from clients, explain procedures and coach them through exercises and tasks, e.g. physiotherapy assistants explain to clients how to use equipment, such as gynemometers, to measure their grip strength. (2)
  • Discuss products and services with suppliers, e.g. physical rehabilitations technicians and audiometric assistants speak with manufacturers' representatives when troubleshooting malfunctioning equipment. (2)
  • Discuss patients' treatments with supervisors and colleagues, e.g. communication assistants discuss alternative learning activities with speech-language pathologists. (3)
  • Reassure and encourage patients, e.g. communication assistants and physical rehabilitation technicians reassure, encourage and motivate patients who are relearning speech and mobility skills. (3)
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Measurement and Calculation
  • Take measurements using common measuring tools, such as rulers and tapes, e.g. physical rehabilitation technicians measure the lengths of patients' limbs when fitting them for walkers. (1)
  • Take various measurements using specialized equipment, e.g. audiometric assistants measure frequencies and decibel levels of sounds using audiometers. (2)
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Data Analysis
  • Compare measurements to specifications, e.g. audiometric assistants compare performance of hearing aids, as measured by American National Institute reference tests, to patients' hearing levels to ensure compatibility. (1)
  • Analyze changes in test results over time, e.g. ophthalmic assistants compare recorded measurements of patients' vision test results from each visit to determine increases or decreases in visual acuity. (2)
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Decision Making
  • Decide that patients are ready to progress to other treatments, e.g. communication assistants decide to give patients more advanced exercises when patients are correctly forming sounds, words and speech patterns. (3)
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Finding Information
  • Physiotherapy assistants may refer to a textbook to obtain information about a particular exercise. (2)
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Critical Thinking
  • Assess suitability of equipment for patients. For example, physical rehabilitation technicians consider patients' injuries and physical limitations, home environments and family support when recommending ambulatory equipment. (2)
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