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OSP Occupational Profile

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NOC Code: NOC Code: 4412 Occupation: Home support workers, housekeepers and related occupations
Occupation Description: Occupation Description:
Home support workers provide personal care and companionship for seniors, persons with disabilities and convalescent clients. Care is provided within the client's residence, in which the home support worker may also reside. They are employed by home care and support agencies, private households, or they may be self-employed. Housekeepers perform housekeeping and other home management duties in private households and other non-institutional, residential settings. Home support workers provide personal care and companionship for seniors, persons with disabilities and convalescent clients. Care is provided within the client's residence, in which the home support worker may also reside. They are employed by home care and support agencies, private households, or they may be self-employed. Housekeepers perform housekeeping and other home management duties in private households and other non-institutional, residential settings.

  • Click on any of the Essential Skills to view sample workplace tasks for this occupation.
  • Scroll down the page to get information on career planning, education and training, and employment and volunteer opportunities.

Table will display the Skill Level for the Noc specified
Essential Skills Essential Skills Levels
Reading Reading 1 2 3
Writing Writing 1 2
Document Use Document Use 1 2
Digital Technology Digital Technology 1 2
Oral Communication Oral Communication 1 2
Money Math Money Math 1
Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting 1
Measurement and Calculation Measurement and Calculation 1 2
Numerical Estimation Numerical Estimation 1 2
Job Task Planning and Organizing Job Task Planning and Organizing 1 2
Decision Making Decision Making 1 2
Problem Solving Problem Solving 1 2 3
Finding Information Finding Information 1 2


  • The skill levels represented in the above chart illustrate the full range of sample tasks performed by experienced workers and not individuals preparing for or entering this occupation for the first time.
  • Note that some occupational profiles do not include all Numeracy and Thinking Essential Skills.

If you would like to print a copy of the chart and sample tasks, click on the "Print Occupational Profile" button at the top of the page.


Reading
  • Read memos from members of the health-care team and notes from the client or the client's family. (1)
  • Read recipes to prepare food which clients request. (1)
  • Read reports from agencies outlining policy changes. (2)
  • Read newsletters from social service agencies or associations announcing workshops. (2)
  • Read newspapers and letters to the patient. (2)
  • Read first-aid manuals. (3)
  • Read text books, pamphlets and journal articles to learn more about health issues such as chronic diseases, mental disorders, exercise and nutrition. (3)
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Writing
  • Write short notes to the next worker or a family member about the client's condition and needs. (1)
  • Complete a client report form, recording changes in the client's mental, physical or emotional condition. (1)
  • Complete forms for supervisors, outlining observations and comments on clients' daily activities, behaviour and special needs. (1)
  • Write a daily log of work accomplished. (1)
  • Record reminders on a calendar. (1)
  • Write personal and business letters for clients. (2)
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Document Use
  • Read street signs. (1)
  • Complete mileage reports. (1)
  • Read lists of phone numbers and addresses or use the phone book, for example, to arrange medical appointments or to contact emergency services. (1)
  • Read labels on medicine bottles and cleaning products to ensure safe use. (1)
  • Read sales receipts and banking statements for clients. (1)
  • Record client names, dates, homemaker codes and expenses on an assignment chart. (1)
  • Review client files which outline the type and frequency of services delivered to each client and relevant history. (2)
  • Fill in reports or logs on daily care given to clients. (2)
  • Read maps to locate new clients' addresses. (2)
  • Read work schedules and assignment sheets to determine work locations, times and duties. (2)
  • Read weekly activity schedules and menus. (2)
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Digital Technology
  • Use word processing. For example, prepare weekly or long-term reports. (2)
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Oral Communication
  • Talk with the client's family to inform them of the client's progress and to learn about the client's condition and needs. (1)
  • Contact medical staff in emergencies. (1)
  • Discuss schedule changes, tasks and procedures with clients. (1)
  • Talk with grocery store clerks, doctors, physiotherapists or suppliers of items such as walkers, canes and oxygen. (1)
  • Entertain clients by reading to them, talking to them or taking them on trips or visits. (2)
  • Talk to supervisors to learn about courses, report on the progress and condition of clients and discuss new cases. (2)
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Money Math
  • Shop for clients, count change and complete expense forms. (1)
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Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting
  • Keep track of clients' grocery money and determine if they have enough food to last until the next visit. (1)
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Measurement and Calculation
  • Measure specified amounts of medication. (1)
  • Measure quantities of ingredients for recipes, doubling or halving as necessary. (2)
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Numerical Estimation
  • Estimate how much food to prepare for a client's meal, depending on the client's state of health and appetite. (1)
  • When planning weekly activities, estimate the time it will take to do various chores. (2)
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Job Task Planning and Organizing
  • Visiting homemakers, housekeepers and workers in related occupations receive assignments and individual care plans from their supervisors in the agency. They plan a daily activity schedule to take into account duties such as cleaning, grocery shopping and making medical appointments. Depending on the clients' needs, they may need to adjust their schedule. Foster children often fit into a pre-existing family routine. (2)
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Decision Making
  • Decide the sequence of activities for cleaning. (1)
  • Decide what patients' will wear and what they will eat (as required). (1)
  • Decide whether patients are well enough to participate in outside activities. (1)
  • Decide whether to accept new clients. (2)
  • Decide when to call for medical or emergency services. The decision is based on knowledge of the patient's medical condition. (2)
  • Decide whether a patient is receiving too little or too much home care and determine when to terminate care. (2)
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Problem Solving
  • There is a lack of food with which to cook proper meals. Make the best of the situation by using the food on hand or grocery shop for the patient, reporting the incident to supervisors if necessary. (1)
  • A patient is hostile. Call upon family members or doctors to get to the roots of the hostility and to recommend a solution. (2)
  • Problems are being experienced with setting boundaries and defining roles with a client. Explain in detail the parameters of the job and may call upon agency personnel to reinforce the information. (2)
  • A client is upset. Determine why this happened and calm the client down. This is particularly difficult when working with mentally challenged clients. (2)
  • A client refuses to eat, take medication or bathe. Explain the importance of keeping up with the necessities of life and use humour to make the client feel more relaxed and willing to co-operate. (2)
  • There is a medical emergency. Call an ambulance if the case is too serious for you to deal with. (3)
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Finding Information
  • Use street maps to find the homes of new patients. (1)
  • Find recipes in client's kitchen files to prepare familiar meals. (1)
  • Refer to books to learn about a client's medical condition. (2)
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