Ontario Skills Passport
Layout structure
header
Header structure
header
navigation
Display Noc
OSP Occupational Profile

OSP Occupational Profile

Print Occupational Profile

Display page browsing back option list
Display page browsing back option list <<Back
Display Noc Details
NOC Code: NOC Code: 7441b Occupation: Sign service/installation technicians
Occupation Description: Occupation Description:
This profile was developed as part of an occupational standard. The NOC group to which it relates is ""Residential and commercial installers and servicers"". Workers in this unit group install and service a wide variety of interior and exterior prefabricated products such as windows, doors, electrical appliances, water heaters, fences, play structures and septic and irrigation systems at residential, commercial or institutional properties. They are employed by companies specializing in specific product installation and service. This profile was developed as part of an occupational standard. The NOC group to which it relates is ""Residential and commercial installers and servicers"". Workers in this unit group install and service a wide variety of interior and exterior prefabricated products such as windows, doors, electrical appliances, water heaters, fences, play structures and septic and irrigation systems at residential, commercial or institutional properties. They are employed by companies specializing in specific product installation and service.

  • Click on any of the Essential Skills to view sample workplace tasks for this occupation.
  • Scroll down the page to get information on career planning, education and training, and employment and volunteer opportunities.

Table will display the Skill Level for the Noc specified
Essential Skills Essential Skills Levels
Reading Reading 1 2 3 4
Writing Writing 1 2 3
Document Use Document Use 1 2 3
Digital Technology Digital Technology 1 2
Oral Communication Oral Communication 1 2 3
Money Math Money Math 1 2
Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting 1 2
Measurement and Calculation Measurement and Calculation 1 2
Numerical Estimation Numerical Estimation 1 2 3
Job Task Planning and Organizing Job Task Planning and Organizing 1 2 3
Decision Making Decision Making 1 2 3 4
Problem Solving Problem Solving 1 2 3
Finding Information Finding Information 1 2


  • The skill levels represented in the above chart illustrate the full range of sample tasks performed by experienced workers and not individuals preparing for or entering this occupation for the first time.
  • Note that some occupational profiles do not include all Numeracy and Thinking Essential Skills.

If you would like to print a copy of the chart and sample tasks, click on the "Print Occupational Profile" button at the top of the page.


Reading
  • Use survey notes to plan where to install a sign. (1)
  • Read work orders for the details of service and installation jobs. (2)
  • Read memos and letters for information about what is going on in the company or industry. (2)
  • Skim trade journals to stay abreast of new technology and industry trends. (2)
  • Read technical reports to increase product knowledge. (3)
  • Read equipment and sign specifications to perform work tasks as per manufacturers' guidelines. (daily) (3)
  • Search equipment operating manuals to obtain operating and maintenance information. (3)
  • Read Department of Transportation manuals to obtain regulatory information. (4)
  • Read electronic sign manuals to obtain technical information. (4)
  • Read safety regulations which use legal and bureaucratic terminology, to comply with requirements. (4)
  • Read computer program training manuals to service/install electronic message centres. (4)
Back to Top

Writing
  • Jot notes when assessing site situations. (1)
  • Enter written information on work orders. (1)
  • Write service reports to record pertinent details about the service provided. (2)
  • Write requisitions for materials and supplies. (2)
  • Write survey reports to record information about the building construction of the worksite, worksite measurements, crane accessibility, power arrangements and line location. (3)
  • Write memos to provide information to management and co-ordinate with others in the company. (3)
Back to Top

Document Use
  • Read signs to obtain safety or directional information. (1)
  • Complete time cards. (1)
  • Read inventory and material lists. (1)
  • Read nameplates on signs. (1)
  • Interpret survey sketches and photographs. (2)
  • Read labels for safety, such as Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS), shipping, product or Canadian Standards Association (CSA) information. (2)
  • Read catalogues to obtain information on available materials. (2)
  • Read production, installation and service schedules. (2)
  • Interpret maps to select transportation routes. (2)
  • Read work orders to understand the parameters of the job. (3)
  • Interpret scale plans and shop drawings. (3)
  • Interpret load/weight tables to determine if a safe hoist is possible. (3)
  • Complete expense reports. (3)
Back to Top

Digital Technology
  • Use computer-controlled machinery or equipment. For example, operate cranes with load moment indicators. (1)
  • Use a database. For example, troubleshoot technical problems using service records. (2)
  • Use graphics software. For example, access and print drawings and site plans. (2)
Back to Top

Oral Communication
  • Speak with retailers and suppliers to purchase materials. (1)
  • Interact with a partner to work jointly on a job. (1)
  • Interact with management to relate survey and other data, obtain information from sales or clarify job information. (2)
  • Direct and instruct crew to ensure that safety is not compromised. (2)
  • Interact with contractors to obtain information and co-ordinate service or installation work with the work of others. (2)
  • Interact with customers to understand their requirements, explain the project and promote business relationships. (2)
  • Provide technical training to crew. (2)
  • Have discussions with other people involved in a project to solve problems or negotiate agreements. (3)
Back to Top

Money Math
  • Receive cash payment from customers. (1)
  • Prepare bills which include calculation of taxes. (2)
Back to Top

Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting
  • Prepare expense reports. (1)
  • Schedule service or installation jobs, adjusting the schedule when necessary to accommodate unforeseen circumstances. (2)
Back to Top

Measurement and Calculation
  • Measure and record dimensions of equipment, doorways, buildings, signs, etc. when conducting site surveys. (1)
  • Calculate area, volume and weight from measurements. (2)
  • Take precise measurements from blueprints using a scale ruler. (2)
Back to Top

Numerical Estimation
  • Estimate weight of a load when measurements cannot be taken directly. (2)
  • Estimate length of time required to complete a job, accounting for potentially complicating factors such as weather, to provide the client with a quotation. (3)
Back to Top

Job Task Planning and Organizing
  • There is variety in work activities but within a routine associated with the parameters of service and installation. In large companies supervisors determine priorities. There are several sources of work assignments including management, contractors and customers. Sign service/installation technicians have a certain scope to determine the order of tasks as per trade practices and industry standards and this significantly impacts efficiency. The work plan of sign service/installation technicians is highly integrated with the work plans of others (e.g., electricians, concrete workers). (3)
Back to Top

Decision Making
  • Make decisions about selecting the most appropriate installation methodology (e.g., choice of fasteners, equipment placement, assembling on ground or in air) giving consideration to safety, government regulations and customer requirements (i.e., choices are often limited by what the customer wants). (2)
  • Decide how to set up cranes and ensure the safety of all crane operations. These decisions rest exclusively with sign service/installation technicians who may be legally liable if accidents occur. (4)
Back to Top

Problem Solving
  • A shipment is short. Locate an alternative supplier to meet the immediate needs of the job. (1)
  • Upon arrival at the work site, it becomes apparent that the ideal equipment is not on hand. Change the installation methodology to complete the job as per the client's original timeframe so that related work by electricians, painters, etc. may proceed as planned. (2)
  • Unpredictable delays have arisen due to traffic jams and poor weather. Co-ordinate with management, contractors and customers to adjust the schedule with the minimum amount of disruption to all parties. (2)
  • An electronic message centre is malfunctioning. Identifying related problems are typically complex due to the computerized environment. The manual of the electronic message centre is first reviewed for technical specifications and information. Up to 70 percent of the time may be taken just to identify the root cause of the technical problem, using deductive reasoning to eliminate potential reasons for the malfunction. (3)
Back to Top

Finding Information
  • Research what are the best materials and products by participating in trade shows and workshops as well as reading supplier manuals. (2)
  • Find out about material availability by consulting catalogues and speaking with co-workers and employers. (2)
Back to Top

footer