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OSP Occupational Profile

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NOC Code: NOC Code: 8255 Occupation: Contractors and supervisors, landscaping, grounds maintenance and horticulture services
Occupation Description: Occupation Description:
This unit group includes landscaping and grounds maintenance contractors, who own and operate their own businesses. This group also includes supervisors who supervise and co-ordinate the activities of workers in the following unit groups: Nursery and Greenhouse Workers (8432) and Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance Labourers (8612). They are employed by landscaping companies, cemeteries, lawn care and tree service companies, nurseries and greenhouses and by landscaping operations of public works departments and private establishments. This unit group includes landscaping and grounds maintenance contractors, who own and operate their own businesses. This group also includes supervisors who supervise and co-ordinate the activities of workers in the following unit groups: Nursery and Greenhouse Workers (8432) and Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance Labourers (8612). They are employed by landscaping companies, cemeteries, lawn care and tree service companies, nurseries and greenhouses and by landscaping operations of public works departments and private establishments.

  • Click on any of the Essential Skills to view sample workplace tasks for this occupation.
  • Scroll down the page to get information on career planning, education and training, and employment and volunteer opportunities.

Table will display the Skill Level for the Noc specified
Essential Skills Essential Skills Levels
Reading Reading 1 2 3 4
Oral Communication Oral Communication 1 2 3 4
Money Math Money Math 1 2 3
Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting 1 2 3 4
Measurement and Calculation Measurement and Calculation 1 2 3
Data Analysis Data Analysis 1 2 3 4
Numerical Estimation Numerical Estimation 1 2
Job Task Planning and Organizing Job Task Planning and Organizing 1 2 3 4
Decision Making Decision Making 1 2
Problem Solving Problem Solving 1 2
Critical Thinking Critical Thinking 1 2


  • The skill levels represented in the above chart illustrate the full range of sample tasks performed by experienced workers and not individuals preparing for or entering this occupation for the first time.
  • Note that some occupational profiles do not include all Numeracy and Thinking Essential Skills.

If you would like to print a copy of the chart and sample tasks, click on the "Print Occupational Profile" button at the top of the page.


Reading
  • Read short text entries in administrative and reporting forms. For example, contractors and supervisors in grounds maintenance may read about clients' lawn care needs in seasonal contract forms. (1)
  • Read email and letters from suppliers, subcontractors, colleagues and clients. For example, read email and faxed letters from clients to learn about work to be done on their properties. (2)
  • Read text entries on product labels. For example, read instructions, warnings, application notes and other text on pesticide and fertilizer labels. (2)
  • Read manuals to learn how to operate equipment. For example, read operating manuals to learn how to set-up and operate riding mowers. (3)
  • Read magazines and association newsletters. For example, read articles in magazines, such as Canadian Gardening and Landscaping & Groundskeeping, to keep current on industry trends and learn about new equipment. (3)
  • Read tenders and requests for proposals. For example, read tenders to learn about project specifications, financial terms and safety and environmental protection requirements. (4)
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Oral Communication
  • Negotiate prices with suppliers. Negotiate the prices of flowers, trees and shrubs with salespeople and coordinate the delivery of equipment, such as power mowers, with equipment suppliers. (2)
  • Exchange technical information with co-workers, colleagues and suppliers, e.g. discuss technical specifications for the construction of decks and patios with subcontractors. (3)
  • Lead staff meetings and discuss topics, such as project timelines, priorities, schedules, workloads, and health and safety concerns. (3)
  • Present to large groups, e.g. landscaping contractors may deliver presentations about innovative landscape design projects at conferences organized by professional associations. (4)
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Money Math
  • Receive cash, cheque, credit and debit card payments and provide change. (1)
  • Calculate and verify invoice and receipt amounts. Multiply numbers of hours worked by hourly rates, add equipment and material costs, calculate applicable taxes and total the amounts. (3)
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Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting
  • Calculate amounts for accounts receivable and payable, bank reconciliations and summaries in general ledgers. (1)
  • Determine the best value among competing tenders for subcontracted work. Perform comparative analyses of data submitted by several contractors and determine which bids offer the best prices and quality. (3)
  • Prepare and verify monthly financial statements and calculate amounts for payroll, utility and tax accounts. (4)
  • Prepare and monitor budgets. Forecast monthly expenditures and revenues and provide for possible cost overruns and delays in the receipt of revenues. (4)
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Measurement and Calculation
  • Measure sizes, distances, angles and volumes using common hand tools, such as tapes, spirit levels and graduated containers. (1)
  • Lay out designs and calculate dimensions for landscape construction, e.g. determine locations to place shrubs, trees, flowers, fences, decks, patios and other landscape structures using measurements from landscape drawings. (2)
  • Calculate quantities of materials, e.g. calculate the area of diseased sod that needs to be treated with fungicide, amount of dilute solution needed for the job and the volume of fungicide and water needed to make the solution. (3)
  • Take precise measurements using specialized tools, e.g. take precise site measurements using laser distance meters and transits. (3)
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Data Analysis
  • Manage small inventories of landscaping and grounds maintenance tools and supplies. Establish desirable inventory levels and calculate turnover rates. Adjust inventory levels to reflect seasonal needs. (2)
  • Collect and analyze operational and financial data, e.g. analyze financial data to draw conclusions about the profitability of the products and services you provide. (4)
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Numerical Estimation
  • Estimate times to carry out job tasks. For example, tree service contractors estimate times needed to remove and relocate trees by considering the size of the trees, the experience and skills of their crew and the likelihood of delays. (2)
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Job Task Planning and Organizing
  • Contractors and supervisors of landscaping, grounds maintenance and horticulture services plan and organize job tasks to meet the needs of as many clients as possible, optimize sales and enhance profitability. Their ability to work for several clients at the same time and to set and manage priorities is critical to their jobs. Supervisors plan and organize job tasks to ensure the quality and timely delivery of landscaping, grounds maintenance and horticultural services. Changes in weather conditions, shortages of labour and materials and other unexpected events force them to frequently reorganize job tasks. (4)
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Decision Making
  • Select suppliers for landscaping and grounds maintenance materials and equipment. Take into account factors such as quality, specifications, prices and promised delivery dates. For example, interior plantscaping contractors and managers select plant suppliers. Tree service contractors and managers select suppliers for pruning tools such as secateurs, branch shredders and chippers and tree climbing gear such as tree spikes, holsters and ropes. (2)
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Problem Solving
  • You are unable to proceed with landscaping projects due to heavy rains, strong winds and shortages of labour and materials. Advise clients and make schedule changes for your crews. (1)
  • You are unable to locate local suppliers for materials specified in contracts. Contact more distant suppliers until you locate materials and arrange for the fastest possible deliveries. (2)
  • Encounter dissatisfied customers. Speak with the customers about their concerns and attempt to negotiate resolutions by redoing work and offering discounts and refunds, as warranted. (2)
  • Discover that workers are performing substandard work. Meet with the workers to discuss the substandard work and clarify expectations. Issue letters of reprimand and dismissal as required. (2)
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Critical Thinking
  • Assess the appropriateness of machines, equipment and software for particular applications. Identify performance criteria, gather and analyze specifications and consider the expert opinions of others. (1)
  • Evaluate the performance of equipment, such as mowers, pruners and leaf blowers. (2)
  • Evaluate the appropriateness of materials and products for specific applications. Consider factors, such as the health and condition of trees, shrubs, plants and turf. Review information about ingredients, health hazards, handling, storage, disposal and other characteristics of chemical products in Material Safety Data Sheets. (2)
  • Evaluate the performance of workers. Consider factors, such as technical skills, safe work practices and their ability to operate equipment and work co-operatively with others. (2)
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