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NOC Code: NOC Code: 9473 Occupation: Binding and finishing machine operators
Occupation Description: Occupation Description:
Binding and finishing machine operators set up, operate or oversee the operation of specific machines, equipment or computerized units that bind and finish printed material. Workers who perform finishing operations in the paper, carton and packaging industries, as well as those who encode and stamp plastic cards are included in this unit group. They are employed by binderies, commercial printing companies, newspapers, magazines and other publishing companies, and establishments in both the public and private sectors that have in-house printing, binding and finishing departments. Binding and finishing machine operators set up, operate or oversee the operation of specific machines, equipment or computerized units that bind and finish printed material. Workers who perform finishing operations in the paper, carton and packaging industries, as well as those who encode and stamp plastic cards are included in this unit group. They are employed by binderies, commercial printing companies, newspapers, magazines and other publishing companies, and establishments in both the public and private sectors that have in-house printing, binding and finishing departments.

  • Click on any of the Essential Skills to view sample workplace tasks for this occupation.
  • Scroll down the page to get information on career planning, education and training, and employment and volunteer opportunities.

Table will display the Skill Level for the Noc specified
Essential Skills Essential Skills Levels
Reading Reading 1 2 3
Writing Writing 1 2
Document Use Document Use 1 2 3
Digital Technology Digital Technology 1 2
Oral Communication Oral Communication 1 2
Money Math Money Math 1 2 3
Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting 1 2 3
Measurement and Calculation Measurement and Calculation 1 2 3
Data Analysis Data Analysis 1 2
Numerical Estimation Numerical Estimation 1 2
Job Task Planning and Organizing Job Task Planning and Organizing 1 2 3
Decision Making Decision Making 1 2 3
Problem Solving Problem Solving 1 2 3
Finding Information Finding Information 1 2


  • The skill levels represented in the above chart illustrate the full range of sample tasks performed by experienced workers and not individuals preparing for or entering this occupation for the first time.
  • Note that some occupational profiles do not include all Numeracy and Thinking Essential Skills.

If you would like to print a copy of the chart and sample tasks, click on the "Print Occupational Profile" button at the top of the page.


Reading
  • Read notices and memos from the office regarding promotions, changes in procedures or holidays. (1)
  • Read job specifications on work orders, checking for the completeness of the information provided. (2)
  • Review documents brought in by the client to ensure their completeness. (2)
  • Read trade magazines to learn new ways of doing layouts or new binding procedures. (2)
  • Read manuals to learn how to operate and adjust new machinery. (3)
  • Read Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) which describe new chemical products and how to use them safely. (3)
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Writing
  • Record information in a daily log to inform other workers of jobs to be completed, supplies to be ordered and problems to be resolved. (1)
  • Write notes indicating what needs to be done to complete a work order, such as "bind and cerlox". (1)
  • Write email messages to co-workers concerning work to be continued on the next shift. (1)
  • Write notes to counter staff to point out problems with orders which will need to be explained to customers. (1)
  • Write letters to clients to thank them for their business or to advise them of new services. (2)
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Document Use
  • Refer to icons on printing instruction forms to determine the type and colour of bindings. (1)
  • Read tables included in Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS). (2)
  • Fill in copying information on Cancopy forms in regard to copying for which royalty payments are to be made in accordance with copyright law. (2)
  • Read instruction labels on job orders and machines and hazard labels on chemical products such as glue. (2)
  • Refer to pictorial information on copier machines to find the location of a paper jam. (2)
  • Complete customer information forms outlining the client's requirements such as photocopying, laminating, thermal or cerlox binding, stamping or embossing. (2)
  • Read lists of jobs to determine priorities. (2)
  • Read production forms which specify machine adjustments for glueing and stitching documents of various thicknesses. (2)
  • Enter production information into a table. (2)
  • Write purchase orders, recording the numbers and descriptions of products. (2)
  • Refer to the "blues" or "blueline", a document which has been made up as a sample copy of what is to be produced, to ensure that the information is complete and well displayed. (2)
  • Refer to assembly drawings of machine parts which need repair. (3)
  • Read schematic diagrams to check the path of machine wiring. (3)
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Digital Technology
  • Use computer-assisted design, manufacture or machining. For example, enter codes into computer-controlled machines such as cutters. (1)
  • Use bookkeeping, billing and accounting software. For example, input invoice data. (2)
  • Use communication software. For example, communicate with co-workers via email. (2)
  • Use word processing. For example, type notes to co-workers or customers. (2)
  • Use a database. For example, find customer order information in a database. (2)
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Oral Communication
  • Interact with supervisors to discuss the status of jobs and the provision of service to customers. (1)
  • Communicate with suppliers and technicians to order supplies or discuss machine repairs. (1)
  • Exchange information with co-workers about the progress of job orders. (1)
  • Instruct apprentices on how to use machines. (2)
  • Interact with customers to clarify an order or discuss modifications to ongoing work. (2)
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Money Math
  • Take cash from customers and make change. (1)
  • Prepare quotes for customers in which material and service charges are totalled and expressed as a "price per unit". (2)
  • Calculate bills for customers, including discounts, taxes and interest on past-due accounts. (3)
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Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting
  • Monitor inventory, tracking various types of supplies. (2)
  • Schedule the time it will take to complete multiple jobs, taking into account equipment and staff available, job priorities, and current inventory levels. (3)
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Measurement and Calculation
  • Measure items to be bound in order to set the binding machines correctly. (1)
  • Calculate areas and perimeters when determining unit costs for particular orders. (2)
  • Take precise measurements of documents using a variety of measurement systems and specialized measuring equipment such as a projection wheel which shows measurements for reducing or enlarging an original. (3)
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Data Analysis
  • On first-time jobs, analyze the rate at which units are being completed. This rate is then used to determine time required for the whole job. (2)
  • Compare data on costs and operational capacity of tabletop and floor model rental equipment needed to complete high volume jobs in order to decide the best rental value. (2)
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Numerical Estimation
  • Estimate the amount of time it will take to complete a job, taking into account the extra time which may be needed in the event of a machine malfunction. (1)
  • Estimate the amount of plastic which will be needed to laminate an order. (1)
  • Estimate the price of a job, considering material costs, number of units and bindery operations required. (2)
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Job Task Planning and Organizing
  • Binding and finishing machine operators are assigned tasks by supervisors and may plan jobs a day to a week in advance. Work priorities are often adjusted to complete rush orders. Since many machines are shared, operators need to co-ordinate their tasks and priorities carefully with co-workers. In addition, since several jobs may be in progress at the same time, it is important to organize the use of space so that orders do not get mixed up. Planning also has to take into account the time which must be left between functions. For instance, binding cannot begin until inks have dried. (3)
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Decision Making
  • Decide what glue temperature is most suitable for a particular job. (1)
  • Decide when to call in service personnel if machines are malfunctioning. (2)
  • Decide when to abort a job if you discover abnormalities such as several pages which are not printed properly. (2)
  • Decide on the priority of work orders based on the size and complexity of the jobs and the deadlines of customers. (2)
  • Decide which of several technical options will produce the highest quality product. (3)
  • Decide whether to refuse an order if it cannot be completed in the timeframe requested by a customer. (3)
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Problem Solving
  • A client's printing order cannot be located. Check files to see if it was misfiled and check all drawers and desk surfaces. Call the client only after all other avenues have been explored. (1)
  • A job order contains incomplete binding information. Contact other staff or phone the customer if necessary to clarify the order. (1)
  • A binding machine breaks down in the middle of a job. Take the machine apart and clean it in an attempt to get it running again. If that fails, call a mechanic. (2)
  • Hot stamping foils or glues are not working properly. Adjust temperatures and review machine settings and processes to locate the source of the problem. (3)
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Finding Information
  • Use a dictionary, thesaurus and computer spell check program to assist clients in editing their texts. (1)
  • Call upon colleagues for advice on how to deal with machine breakdowns. (2)
  • Refer to manuals to find the adjustments that should be made to the machines when carrying out rarely done processes. (2)
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