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OSP Occupational Profile

OSP Occupational Profile

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NOC Code: NOC Code: 9537a Occupation: Signmakers
Occupation Description: Occupation Description:
This profile was developed as part of an occupational standard. One of the NOC groups to which it relates is "Other Assemblers and Inspectors". This unit group includes assemblers and inspectors, not elsewhere classified, who assemble and inspect a variety of products, such as jewellery, silverware, clocks and watches, musical instruments, sporting goods, toys, and other miscellaneous products. They are employed by a wide variety of manufacturing companies. This profile was developed as part of an occupational standard. One of the NOC groups to which it relates is "Other Assemblers and Inspectors". This unit group includes assemblers and inspectors, not elsewhere classified, who assemble and inspect a variety of products, such as jewellery, silverware, clocks and watches, musical instruments, sporting goods, toys, and other miscellaneous products. They are employed by a wide variety of manufacturing companies.

  • Click on any of the Essential Skills to view sample workplace tasks for this occupation.
  • Scroll down the page to get information on career planning, education and training, and employment and volunteer opportunities.

Table will display the Skill Level for the Noc specified
Essential Skills Essential Skills Levels
Reading Reading 1 2 3
Writing Writing 1 2 3 4
Document Use Document Use 1 2 3
Digital Technology Digital Technology 1 2 3
Oral Communication Oral Communication 1 2
Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting 1 2
Measurement and Calculation Measurement and Calculation 1 2 3
Numerical Estimation Numerical Estimation 1 2
Job Task Planning and Organizing Job Task Planning and Organizing 1 2 3
Decision Making Decision Making 1 2 3
Problem Solving Problem Solving 1 2
Finding Information Finding Information 1 2 3


  • The skill levels represented in the above chart illustrate the full range of sample tasks performed by experienced workers and not individuals preparing for or entering this occupation for the first time.
  • Note that some occupational profiles do not include all Numeracy and Thinking Essential Skills.

If you would like to print a copy of the chart and sample tasks, click on the "Print Occupational Profile" button at the top of the page.


Reading
  • Read brief memos from co-workers. (1)
  • Read Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) labels on chemical products. (1)
  • Read trade magazines to keep up to date on techniques. (2)
  • Read product update sheets. (2)
  • Read product information from equipment manufacturers. (2)
  • Read zoning laws to ensure compliance. (3)
  • Read safety manuals relating to the use of chemicals. (3)
  • Read computer software manuals to learn how to use a program or how to operate equipment such as a scanner. (3)
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Writing
  • Write time logs which describe daily activities. (1)
  • Write inventory materials. (1)
  • Write letters, memos and faxes to communicate with customers. (2)
  • Write tenders or quotes. (3)
  • Write procedures manuals for reference by co-workers. (4)
  • Write articles for magazines and for the Internet to share information with colleagues. (4)
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Document Use
  • Read safety labels. (1)
  • Read permits. (2)
  • Read product specifications. (2)
  • Read and proofread copy sheets for signage. (2)
  • Fill in invoices and requisitions. (2)
  • Read and interpret work orders and purchase orders. (2)
  • Fill out work orders to document technical requirements. (3)
  • Read site surveys. (3)
  • Interpret scale drawings which will be the basis for artwork. (3)
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Digital Technology
  • Use communications software. For example, use email to communicate with others in the field. (2)
  • Use word processing. For example, use word processing software to write memos, letters and quotes. (2)
  • Use computer-assisted design, manufacture or machining. For example, use CAD Link, Sign Post, Gerber or Sign Lab to design and lay out signs. (3)
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Oral Communication
  • Interact with shipping companies and suppliers concerning the content and timing of deliveries. (1)
  • Communicate with co-workers and with supervisors to clarify schedules and co-ordinate activities. (2)
  • Discuss government safety regulations with Canadian Standards Association (CSA) inspectors and building inspectors. (2)
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Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting
  • Determine purchasing requirements for a particular job. (2)
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Measurement and Calculation
  • Measure all the materials necessary to make a sign. (1)
  • Use stencils, squares and tape measures to lay out signage. (3)
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Numerical Estimation
  • Estimate the amount of material required to do a job and the time required to complete it. (2)
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Job Task Planning and Organizing
  • Signmakers organize their priorities to take into account the many interim deadlines which are involved in carrying through each job from initial consultation and design to a finished product. This requires co-ordinating activities with various departments, suppliers and subcontractors to ensure that all supplies and services are available when needed. While supervisors generally provide broad guidance on the sequence of assignments as a whole, signmakers prioritize tasks within each job. (3)
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Decision Making
  • Decide what kinds of paints to use. (1)
  • Decide how best to install the sign taking into account factors such as the sign's placement and power feed. (2)
  • Make decisions about sign design such as determining which letter styles and colours would be most attractive. (3)
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Problem Solving
  • There are problems in co-ordinating the use of equipment with other workers. Discuss equipment requirements with other workers and schedule jobs to avoid bottlenecks. (1)
  • Suppliers may not deliver needed supplies in the time-frame promised. Cope with delays by re-organizing work and/or finding alternate ways of doing the job. (2)
  • Paint has faded prematurely on a sign and a dissatisfied customer wants the sign repaired. Investigate cost-effective ways to repair the sign and maintain customer good-will. (2)
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Finding Information
  • Refer to catalogues to locate needed supplies. (2)
  • Read tool manuals in order to solve fabrication difficulties. (2)
  • Read Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) to find out the properties of various chemicals. (2)
  • Seek information on new techniques and new products through such sources as trade magazines, the Internet, co-workers or networking. (3)
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