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OSP Occupational Profile

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NOC Code: NOC Code: 9537b Occupation: Other products assemblers, finishers and inspectors
Occupation Description: Occupation Description:
This unit group includes assemblers, finishers and inspectors, not elsewhere classified, who assemble, finish and inspect components or products of various materials, such as jewellery, silverware, buttons, pencils, non-prescription lenses, brushes, clocks and watches, musical instruments, sporting goods, toys and other miscellaneous products. They are employed by a wide variety of manufacturing companies. This unit group includes assemblers, finishers and inspectors, not elsewhere classified, who assemble, finish and inspect components or products of various materials, such as jewellery, silverware, buttons, pencils, non-prescription lenses, brushes, clocks and watches, musical instruments, sporting goods, toys and other miscellaneous products. They are employed by a wide variety of manufacturing companies.

  • Click on any of the Essential Skills to view sample workplace tasks for this occupation.
  • Scroll down the page to get information on career planning, education and training, and employment and volunteer opportunities.

Table will display the Skill Level for the Noc specified
Essential Skills Essential Skills Levels
Reading Reading 1 2 3
Writing Writing 1 2
Document Use Document Use 1 2 3
Digital Technology Digital Technology 1
Oral Communication Oral Communication 1 2
Money Math Money Math 1 2
Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting 1
Measurement and Calculation Measurement and Calculation 1 2 3
Numerical Estimation Numerical Estimation 1 2
Job Task Planning and Organizing Job Task Planning and Organizing 1
Decision Making Decision Making 1 2
Problem Solving Problem Solving 1 2
Finding Information Finding Information 1 2


  • The skill levels represented in the above chart illustrate the full range of sample tasks performed by experienced workers and not individuals preparing for or entering this occupation for the first time.
  • Note that some occupational profiles do not include all Numeracy and Thinking Essential Skills.

If you would like to print a copy of the chart and sample tasks, click on the "Print Occupational Profile" button at the top of the page.


Reading
  • Read notes from suppliers, such as a note indicating that a colour of a supply has been discontinued. (1)
  • Read letters containing requests from customers. (2)
  • Read product specification sheets and assembly instructions. (2)
  • Read technical bulletins from suppliers. (2)
  • Read operating and maintenance manuals to learn about assembling products and troubleshooting equipment. (3)
  • Use parts manuals to look up items for customers. The manuals provide descriptions of items along with corresponding numbers and costs. (3)
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Writing
  • Record shortages of materials on work orders. (1)
  • Make brief notes to remember how to assemble certain parts. (1)
  • Write lists for own records, outlining the various types of products which have been assembled. (1)
  • Write notes to laboratories, suppliers or store managers to explain problems such as missing parts or to provide information about production. (2)
  • Prepare price quotes for insurance companies describing production jobs from which claims have been made by customers. (2)
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Document Use
  • Read lists of parts in stock and lists of work completed. (1)
  • Read code labels on parts being assembled. (1)
  • Read labels on boxes of products, containing product information and model numbers. (1)
  • Read work orders and complete invoices for product assembly or installation. (2)
  • Read work schedules. (2)
  • Read manufacturers' materials, such as those outlining battery capacities and how long batteries and light bulbs will last. (2)
  • Recognize refraction angles or the angles made by frame tubing during assembly. (2)
  • Read tables for material density and heat requirements for welds. (2)
  • Complete timesheet indicating quantities of products produced, job numbers and names. (2)
  • Fill out forms to order parts. (2)
  • Read equipment inspection forms. (2)
  • Interpret assembly drawings when mounting fixtures or assembling products such as lights and switches. (3)
  • Read product specification forms, detailing specifications to be followed when assembling products and the performance parameters of products. (3)
  • Read blueprints accompanying rebuilt components. (3)
  • Read schematic diagrams when carrying out repairs on wire products, power supplies or bicycle lamps. (3)
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Digital Technology
  • Use computer-controlled equipment. For example, eyeglass assemblers input information regarding prescriptions to calculate lens specifications. (1)
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Oral Communication
  • Contact suppliers to place orders, confirm shipment dates or check the availability and quality of materials. (1)
  • Participate in staff meetings to learn about new products and discuss ideas for improving production. (2)
  • Give directions to assistants and provide advice to new employees about operating equipment. (2)
  • Interact with supervisors to discuss orders, work in progress and problems with products. (2)
  • Interact with customers to provide technical information regarding product construction and assembly. (2)
  • Discuss repair requirements with spot welders and inspectors. (2)
  • Co-ordinate work with co-workers to ensure there is no duplication of tasks when working on joint projects. (2)
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Money Math
  • Calculate customer invoices, including totals and taxes, for product assembly and installation. (2)
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Scheduling or Budgeting and Accounting
  • Monitor work schedules and daily production to provide input into productivity reports. (1)
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Measurement and Calculation
  • Measure the length, width and height of the products being produced to ensure they meet customer specifications. (1)
  • Measure the voltage and current in batteries. (1)
  • Measure the precise location for a hole to be drilled when assembling antennae. (1)
  • Measure, if cutting a lens, the curvature of angles within the lens to fit eye glass prescriptions. This measurement involves the calculation of spheres, cylinders and axis dimensions using specialized pieces of machinery. (3)
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Numerical Estimation
  • Estimate how many products can be produced, considering the limits of available work space and which models have been requested. (2)
  • Estimate costs involved in assembling products, taking into account taxes on materials and the number of steps involved in particular jobs. (2)
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Job Task Planning and Organizing
  • The assemblers and inspectors in this group organize their tasks according to work orders received from customers and schedules set by supervisors. Work is fairly repetitive and routine, particularly if working on assembly lines. (1)
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Decision Making
  • Decide how best to set up in the space that has been assigned by the store or warehouse manager. (1)
  • Decide which items to reject according to quality standards. For example, Venetian blind assemblers decide whether slats are in acceptable condition for shipping and if colours are correct. If not, place them in "redo areas". (2)
  • Decide on the thickness of weld required to hold and seal products. (2)
  • Make decisions on how to fix products to satisfy customers. For example, golf club assemblers decide how much lead to add to clubs to arrive at the required weights when customers want heavier golf clubs. (2)
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Problem Solving
  • Some parts needed to assemble products are missing. Search for parts of the same type in supply areas where spares are kept or in warehouses. (1)
  • The assembly diagrams are difficult to understand. Ask the supervisors for assistance. (1)
  • Parts have been bent during shipping. Straighten or replace the damaged parts. (1)
  • There are production difficulties. For example, eyeglass assemblers may find liquid alloy injected into lenses does not create a vacuum seal. The lens must be remade. (2)
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Finding Information
  • Find specifications for various products on charts. (1)
  • Look up pricing information in files or call appropriate suppliers for the information. (2)
  • Refer to manufacturers' lists and reference manuals for product information, such as prescriptions for glasses, thicknesses and tints. (2)
  • Consult instruction manuals to find solutions to assembly problems. (2)
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